Office History    

MID 1920s - 1940s

Founded in 1923, Perry Shaw and Hepburn, Architects, established itself with a mix of academic, civic, residential and commercial projects. Work from this first generation reflects a range of historical motifs popular at the time, often interpreted in simplified, idiosyncratic form. The firm's first major commission was awarded in 1927 and called for the master planning and complete restoration of Colonial Williamsburg. The immense scope of the project carried the firm through the Great Depression, and ultimately encompassed 84 reconstructed and 66 restored structures.

 

 
COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG RESTORATION,   Williamsburg, VA 
 

1926

COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG RESTORATION, Williamsburg, VA

 
 
 

1934


RADCLIFFE COLLEGE, LONGFELLOW HALL, Cambridge, MA

RADCLIFFE COLLEGE, LONGFELLOW HALL, Cambridge, MA

 
 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, HOUGHTON RARE BOOK LIBRARY Cambridge MA

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, HOUGHTON RARE BOOK LIBRARY

Cambridge, MA

 

1941

 

 

1947 - 1952

By the 1940s, the renamed Perry Shaw Kehoe and Dean, Architects, were a fixture in the Boston architecture scene, and were commissioned for a series of important buildings in and around the city.

 

 
 

1947


JORDAN MASH DEPARTMENT STORE,  Boston, MA

JORDAN MARSH DEPARTMENT STORE, Boston, MA

 
 
MIT BAKER HOUSE,  Cambridge, MA

MIT BAKER HOUSE, Cambridge, MA

 

1949

 

 

1952 - 1970s

The firm has changed its name several time under this period.  By 1950s,  renamed as Perry Shaw Hepburn and Dean, Architects, the firm continued with a wide variety of projects, including a growing focus on college and university work. Long-term relationships with several universities cemented the firm's commitment to academic architecture, and provided an opportunity to observe evolving campus requirements over time. The firm's involvement with schools was also comprehensive in its scale, ranging from master planning at Furman University to developing the case study room model still in use today at Harvard Business School. During this period, the firm's designs explored vernacular influences, international Style simplicity, and Brutalist monumentality, reflecting the influence of their specific geographic and historical contexts.

 

 
 

1955


HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL,  ALDRICH HALL, Cambridge, MA

FURMAN UNIVERSITY MASTER PLAN,  Greenville, SC 1952

 
 

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, Cambridge, MA

 

1955

 
 
 

1956


AMERICAN MILITARY CEMETARY, Cambridge, England

 
 

BOSTON MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, Cambridge, MA

 

1959

 

 

1965 - 1968    Firm name change to Perry Dean Hepburn and Stewart

1968 - 1975    Firm name change to Perry Dean and Stewart

1975 - 1976    Firm name change to Perry Dean Partners Inc.

1976 - 1982    Firm name change to Perry Dean Stahl & Rogers Inc.

 

 
 

1977


MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL, COX BUILDING, Boston, MA

 
 

McLEAN HOSPITAL, HALL MERCER CHILDREN'S CENTER, Belmont, MA

 

1977

 
 
 

1977


WELLESLEY COLLEGE SCIENCE CENTER,  Wellesley, MA

 
 

U.S.P.S. SOUTH POSTAL ANNEX, Boston, MA

 

1979

 

 

1982 - Present

By the 1980s, renamed as Perry Dean Rogers and Partners, the firm was pursuing larger commissions, and focusing on buildings for higher education. Several substantial academic commissions, including the Olin Memorial Library addition at Wesleyan University, and Beineke Student Activities Village at Hamilton College, provided opportunities to develop new architectural strategies, and became emblematic of the firm's work from this period. Inventive interpretations of historical motifs, revealed building systems, and bright color palettes combine differently in each new project,establishing a body of work actively engaged with the contemporary architectural discourse of high post-modernism. Under this third generation of leadership, the firm also explored international work, with a design for the US Embassy in Amman, Jordan.

 

 
 

1984


HAMILTON COLLEGE STUDENT ACTIVITIES VILLAGE, Clinton, NY

 
 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, OLIN LIBRARY, Middletown, CT

 

1986

 
 
 

1992


U.S. EMBASSY, Amman, Jordan